Eggs of the chocolaty variety are a huge no-no for our fur friends this Easter Easter is getting ever closer. We can almost smell the delicious chocolate in the form of eggs, bunnies and bars! We’re excited – are you?

It’s a wonderful time of year where no one blames you for being decadent but chocolate is a notorious toxin to our pets so they shouldn’t be given the chance to dig into that stash you’ve hidden away.

Here’s what to do should your clever pooch manage to find that chocolate and dig in while you are unsuspecting.

1. SIGNS THAT YOUR POOCH HAS BITTEN OFF MORE THAN HE CAN CHEW

• Vomiting
• Diarrhea
• Increased body temperature
• Increased reflex responses
• Muscle rigidity
• Rapid breathing
• Increased heart rate
• Low blood pressure
• Seizures
• Advanced signs (cardiac failure, weakness, and coma)

2. TAKE NOTE OF THE TYPE AND AMOUNT OF CHOCOLATE CONSUMED

MILK CHOCOLATE –
Mild toxicity - 40 grams consumed per kilo.
Severe toxicity – 115 grams consumed per kilo.

SEMI SWEET CHOCOLATE –
Mild toxicity – 18 grams consumed per kilo .
Severe toxicity – 60 grams consumed per kilo.

BAKING CHOCOLATE (Highest toxicity) –
Sever toxicity – can occur from just 6 grams consumed per kilo.

3. GET THEM TO THE VET IMMEDIATELY

• Call your Veterinarian immediately to notify them that you are coming and ask what care you can start before arriving.

• Make sure your dog is kept calm and quiet.

• Your Veterinarian will complete a thorough examination of your pet, which includes blood analysis, electrolyte panel and urinalysis to determine the level of toxicity.

• Your pet will be kept on fluids to hydrate them. During several days after the incident their diet should also be kept bland, for example rice and chicken.

Please note, there is no antidote to the toxicity of chocolate so it is very important to keep any goodies this Easter out of paw’s reach.

EGGS FOR EASTER!

While eggs of the chocolaty variety are a huge no-no for our fur friends this Easter there’s no reason why they should miss out on all the fun!

It may surprise you to know that a whole, hard-boiled egg is a healthy and nutritious treat for pets. That’s right! Shell and all! In fact, in ancient times, dogs of the wild would eat eggs regularly as part of their diet.

Eggs shells are a great source of calcium and protein for our pets, while egg whites are one of the highest protein foods around. Eggs as a whole provide benefits that help build muscle, strengthen the hair, teeth, bones and repair tissue.

We do recommend that the eggs be boiled foremost as this eradicates any threat of transmitted diseases or salmonella poisoning to our domesticated animals. While there are no confirmed reports of this there are no additional benefits of a raw egg over a boiled egg. If feeding your pet a whole egg concerns you, you can either tap around the shell to break it up or even remove the shell completely and crush it in a blender or mortar and pestle for sprinkling over their food.

It is recommended that you feed no more than one egg per day to your pet for a nutritious and healthy treat or addition to their meal.

NOTE: When adding something new into your pet's diet it is important to maintain a close eye in case of negative effects as some pets have allergies and tolerances.